A Word for Living Creatures

- beginning with a line from Paul Celan's "The Meridian"
Recent Tweets @ErinMFeldman

nypl:

Happy Caturday! Our #ireadeverywhere campaign has been going just purrrrfectly, with thousands of people - including Jim ParsonsNeil GaimanMindy KalingCookie Monster and Hillary Clinton - participating and sharing their love of reading with the world. We’ve also been getting our fair share of feline photos, including one from best-selling author Dan Brown, and this one from our friends at Reading Rainbow (which has been posting tons of amazing stuff, including a photo from host Levar Burton) - this photo of their graphic designer Luci reading with her kitty. Happy Caturday! And send pics of yourself (and your cat) reading! 

My cat hasn’t even been missing twenty-four hours, but I feel questions bubbling to the surface: What if she was run over by a car? What if some buzzards mistook her for a rabbit and went in for the kill? What if she’s lost and doesn’t know how to find her way home? What if she’s lying injured in some drainage ditch?

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But there are pleasures to be had from books beyond being lightly entertained. There is the pleasure of being challenged; the pleasure of feeling one’s range and capacities expanding; the pleasure of entering into an unfamiliar world, and being led into empathy with a consciousness very different from one’s own; the pleasure of knowing what others have already thought it worth knowing, and entering a larger conversation.

From “The Pleasures of Reading to Impress Yourself" by Rebecca Mead for The New Yorker

What are some challenging reads you’ve enjoyed?

(via strandbooks)

fastcompany:

From a zen garden to a pet rabbit, at first, no silly luxury was spared for a co-working space set up by two Dutch designers. But soon, things started suspiciously changing, until the office was something out of 1984.

“After a while it became clear something strange was happening.”

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duino-elegiesBookplate for Rainer Maria Rilke, ca. 1900 Height 9.; Width 4.2 cm. From the estate of Louis Graf, Munich, graphic printer.

explore-blog:

Beloved British cartoonist Ralph Steadman's superb vintage illustrations for George Orwell’s Animal Farm, published on August 17, 1945.

Every branch which burns also longed to blossom, she thinks. - from Kyle McCord’s “Poem Without Manners”

Every branch that burns also longs to blossom, 
to take flight, she says, but you’re not listening, 
you’re nodding, mumbling to yourself, shuttering closed
another photo, another orange and gold sunset, 
its burnt shadows unfolding their forms,
and you don’t hear her, she’s your drone during the day 
and the moan you request in the night,
but she is quiet tonight,refusing your form
and posture, almost unresponsive,
catatonic, the word placed on the tongue
and swallowed, so you turn, and she’s there
but not there, she’s unfurling in the lamplight,
all glow-
edged and radiant, she might be 
your fury, the red-winged thing you seek 
every twilight, and why didn’t I see until now?
the bed aglow, turning to flame, and
the smell of sulphur, maybe camphor,
and something is orange-hot, red-hot,
something is on fire, something is taking flight, 
something - the bedposts - is gnarling
into branches, the pop and hiss, embers
in her hair, a crown of fireflies, you think,
but no, no, flower petals, 
flower petals and feathers exploding 
into blossom, orange and red and gold, 
into night, into the viewfinder 
before settling to ground, 
drifting in the summer breeze.

h-ngm-n:

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Like looking over our shoulder at what’s onscreen, an RSS-feed powered by the brains behind H_NGM_N: here’s a sampling of what made it on our radar last week.

What I mean here is that you have to remain committed to the ultimate goal, which isn’t to win the immediate approval of the online…

instagram:

A World of Childhood Fantasy in Narni, Italy

For more enchanting photos and videos from Narni, Italy, explore the Narni location page and browse the #Narni hashtag.

There are stunning similarities between the real-life town of Narni and the fictional world of Narnia: blazing green hills, clear blue skies and picturesque stone structures.

In fact, the classic fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia, written by C.S. Lewis in 1950, is rumored to have been inspired by this small Italian town 50 miles north of Rome. According to biographer Walter Hooper, Lewis was fascinated by ancient history, and Narni—named “Narnia” in Roman times—was highlighted by the children’s author in his personal atlas.

Whether Lewis visited Narni has never been confirmed, but even today, its cobblestone streets and castle fortress look like they belong in a magical, medieval novel. And while there are no mythical, talking creatures roaming the land, Narni still feels like a place pulled straight out of our childhood imaginations.